Tag Archives: inclusive development

Inclusive Green Economy and Structural Transformation in Africa

Over the last decade, African economies recorded impressive economic growth rates. Economic growth remains vigorous and growth is forecasted to be 5.5% in 2013-2014 in Sub-Saharan Africa. Today, almost a third of the countries in the region are growing at 6% or more. African countries are now routinely among the fastest growing countries in the world (World Bank, 2013). Despite the remarkable economic performance, Africa has the world’s highest proportion of poor people and is off track to meeting key MDGs (ECA, 2014). It is also projected that the continent’s population will increase by approximately 800 million people by 2040, putting even more pressure on natural resources. The challenge confronting the region therefore is not only to maintain, but to translate the rapid economic growth into sustained and inclusive development, based on economic diversification that creates jobs, contributes to reduced inequality and poverty, and enhances access to basic services. This underlies the renewed calls by countries for a structural transformation that fosters sustained and inclusive economic growth (Lin, 2012). Rodrik(2013) notes that while East Asian countries grew rapidly and turned their farmers into manufacturing workers, diversified their economies, and exported a range of increasingly sophisticated goods, little of that is taking place in Africa today.

Read the full brief and share your comments:
https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/6856146-Gaye-Inclusive%20Green%20Economy%20and%20Structural%20Transformation%20in%20Africa.pdf

Inclusive Green Affordable Housing for All

Affordable Housing (AH) is deemed affordable depending on family’s income and particular country’s housing status. AH can address all three dimensions of sustainability and it can influence 13 goals set in Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) out of 17 goals directly and indirectly (United Nations, 2014). SDGs are designed as action-oriented goal in 2012 to realize 8 Millennium Development Goals set in the year back in 2000. It is envisaged that AH would result in financial and social inclusion of Economically Weaker Section (EWS) and Low Income Group (LIG). AH can offer them an opportunity to prosper economically and to enjoy basic urban services (Sen, 1998). It will address the Goal 11 of SDGs i.e. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

Read the full brief and share your comments:
https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/6599128-Mukherjee-Inclusive%20Green%20Affordable%20Housing%20for%20All.pdf

World Market Economic Conditions, Diversification of Income, Indigenous Economy and Philippine Economic Conditions with Regards to Sustainable Development

At the international level, financial markets affect global investments of the different countries. Meanwhile, global investments impact the imports, exports, global employment, labour and demand for products and services worldwide. According to the International Monetary Fund Report (2011), the global market has been
vulnerable to the risks caused by certain financial, economic and political conditions. ‘Markets may lose patience and become disorderly if political developments derail momentum on fiscal consolidation and financial repair and reform’ (IMF, 2011).

On the other hand, the focus now of the individuals in the global society has been on how to have a higher financial capital. Income diversification is one of the strategies that can help to achieve this end (Kasem,2007). In particular, this would be through diversifying on-farm and off-farm activities especially in the rural
areas. In addition, according to the study of DeMurger (2010), the factors that affected the income diversification of households in northern China included education, migration, household position asset position and working resources, labor force and availability of local credit institutions. Moreover, income diversification also depends on one’s location, practices and the demand for labor. However, the farmers and indigenous peoples who are living in rural areas of
the different countries have been continually struggling to diversify their sources of income without losing their lands. These same situations were evident in the findings of Lopez and Sierra (2011) about the indigenous Jivaroan cultivation systems of Western Amazonia and in the study of Himley (2009) about conservation, interventions and struggles of rural Andean communities to assert territorial authority and to consolidate their livelihoods’ where social capital also plays an important role (Himley, 2009).

Read the full brief and share your comments below.
https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/6524114-Otarra_World_Market_Economic_Philippine.pdf

Including women and the poor in water management systems

Providing everyone with access to water is vital to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on health, livelihoods and economic growth. Providing women and the poor (lowincome earners and those who are landless) with access to water is especially important in rural and urban fringe areas. A series of far-reaching strategic solutions and policies need to promote social inclusion to achieve the SDGs, including to:

• Train and build the capacity of women and marginalized socio-economic groups so that they can have more active leadership roles in water management systems, at household and community levels.
• Train policy makers, planners and those in water organizations to actively consider women and poor farmers’ water needs.
• Develop specific technologies and inclusive institutions and policies so women and poor farmers can participate in water use and management systems in the context of prevailing gender norms and local realities.
• Improve women’s access and rights to water, through informal channels and legal mechanisms.

Click on the link below to read the full brief and share your comments
https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/628473-de%20Haan-Including%20women%20and%20the%20poor%20in%20water%20management%20systems.pdf

Strategically engaging women in clean energy solutions for sustainable development and health

There are three billion people, or 40% of the world, that still relies on biomass for cooking, lighting, and heating (WHO, 2014). This has led to a significant burden for the planet and for those living on it. Unsustainable biomass collection depletes forests, contributes to soil erosion and loss of watersheds, placing additional pressure on agricultural productivity and food security. Searching for and using solid biomass fuels places women and children’s safety at risk and jeopardizes human health and household and community air quality through toxic smoke emissions. In regions such as sub-Saharan Africa, where the lack of access to clean energy solutions and electrification is particularly significant, nearly a third of the urban population and the majority of the rural poor are using biomass for cooking and heating in traditional open fires (GACC, 2014).

Like nearly all global environmental problems, the consequences of reliance on biomass for cooking and lighting impacts women significantly more than men (ICRW 2010). Women and children, usually girls, spend several hours per day gathering fuel, increasing their daily drudgery and increasing their vulnerability to sexual violence. As forests are degraded, the energy burden increases and women are forced to walk even further to collect fuel or use more toxic fuels, such as dung or trash. Risks for displaced and refugee women are even more alarming as 75% – 90% of the rapes reported occur when women leave camps for cooking fuel (WRC, 2011). The health risks of household air pollution are substantial. As the primary managers of household energy, women are disproportionately at risk for harmful emissions exposure every day. Recent global health estimates show that household air pollution leads to over 4 million deaths annually, while millions more suffer from cancer, pneumonia, heart and lung disease, blindness, and burns (Lancet 2013). Approximately 300,000 of the deaths, 88% of which are women, are attributed to burns resulting from traditional cooking fires (Lancet, 2013).

While women and girls bear the brunt of clean energy poverty, their central and pivotal role in sustainable development is becoming increasingly clear (WB, 2014; UN Women 2014). The strategic engagement of women in the clean energy sector is directly in line with the landmark 1987 report of the World Commission on Environment and Development which states, “sustainable development is economic, social and environmental development that ensures human well-being and dignity, ecological integrity, gender equality and social justice, now and in the future.” Building upon the synergies between gender equality, environment, economics and health are critical as we move forward on the path towards sustainable development.

Click on the below link to read the full brief and share your comments.
https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/631479-Shankar-Women_in%20Clean%20Energy_Solutions.pdf

Transforming disaster risk reduction for more inclusive, equitable and sustainable development

This article highlights three key areas in which efforts to reduce the underlying causes of vulnerability and drivers of risk to environmental hazards need to be improved in order to create more inclusive, equitable and sustainable development: 1) the role of context and culture in creating risk, 2) the need to better link disaster risk reduction (DRR), climate change adaptation (adaptation) and development, and 3) the enabling of transformative change.

Read the full brief below and share your comments
https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/616462-thomalla%20et%20al%20-%20transforming%20disaster%20risk%20reduction%20for%20more%20inclusive%20equitable%20sd.pdf

生态减贫:包容性发展视角下的路径选择 (Ecological poverty eradication: path selection under inclusive development)

This brief is submitted in the Chinese language. The full brief could be accessed through the below link. Your comments could be in either English or Chinese.

摘 要
文章旨在探索新时期中国减贫的突破口,运用区域经济学分析方法分析生态恶化和环境破坏对巩固减贫成果和深入推 进扶贫开发的制约。文章认为生态型贫困是未来我国扶贫攻坚的重点,中国的贫困主要发生在生态脆弱区,这些地区扶贫难度大、减 贫成果难以巩固、贫困与生态恶化互为因果,需要包容性措施来化解生态改善与减贫目标的冲突。文章建议我国应在贫困落后地区协 调经济增长与资源环境保护的关系,确保经济增长的效益惠及区域所有人群,尤其是贫困人口,让更多人享受改革和发展的成果,这 也是包容性发展的内在要求。生态减贫是中国突破减贫瓶颈的必然选择,是治贫的根本。

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/6056GSDR%20Brief%2020CN.pdf